NEW YORK WEATHER

Technology has given people more ways to connect, but has it also given them more opportunities to lie?

You might text your friend a white lie to get out of going to dinner, exaggerate your height on a dating profile to appear more attractive or invent an excuse to your boss over email to save face.

Social psychologists and communication scholars have long wondered not just who lies the most, but where people tend to lie the most – that is, in person or through some other communication medium.

A seminal 2004 study was among the first to investigate the connection between deception rates and technology. Since then, the ways we communicate have shifted – fewer phone calls and more social media messaging, for example – and I wanted to see how well earlier results held up.

Deception and technology

Back in 2004, communication researcher Jeff Hancock and his colleagues had 28 students report the number of social interactions they had via face-to-face communication, the phone, instant messaging and email over seven days. Students also reported the number of times they lied in each social interaction.

The results suggested people told the most lies per social interaction on the phone. The fewest were told via email.

The findings aligned with a framework Hancock called the “feature-based model”. According to this model, specific aspects of a…

Read more

donate button
Please choose the donation payment system

Donation Information

I would like to make a donation in the amount of:

$1,000$500$100$50Other

I would like this donation to repeat each month

Tribute Gift

Check here to donate in honor or memory of someone

Donor Information

Add me to your mailing list

NEW YORK WEATHER

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *